Fielder’s Choice

Community commitment

Last Sunday wrapped up National Newspaper Week.

Typically, I write my column during that week about community newspapers, particularly this one. But last week, I chose to write about a snake.

A kind lady recently walked into the front office to renew her subscription to The South Reporter.

I overheard her talking about how she didn’t do online and still enjoyed receiving her newspaper in print.

It made my day – made me smile.

The fact is, you can get your South Reporter both ways or either. Subscribers to the print newspaper can also access the E-Edition, or those who just want the digital edition can take care of that online, at www.southreporter.com.

Either way, in print or online, the content of a quarterpage ad in last week’s newspaper, that promoted National Newspaper Week, holds true.

“Local papers are the primary source of news and information in communities across the nation,” according to a survey conducted by The DeWitt Center for Media and Democracy at Duke University. “Now with our affiliated online media, we’re reaching more people than ever before. Whether in print or online, keep reading your local paper.”

Whether you get it in print or online, it’s all local, produced by your community newspaper staff.

I’m old school. I started working at a community newspaper in high school. I’m 58 now. I hope the printed newspaper never goes away.

I’m writing this column on a Sunday afternoon. As I look up front to the counter, there are about 10 copies of last week’s South Reporter still available. The same holds true in the rack attached to the front of the building.

Shortly after lunch, I stopped by one of our top-selling vendors. The store gets 120 newspapers to sell. There were less than 20 of last week’s edition left.

And that’s just a few examples that convince me you like to read your community newspaper, too.

The South Reporter is blessed to be a part of Marshall County, and we’re blessed that you advertise with us and you read us.

I enjoy spending some time near the front counter on Wednesdays, when the newspaper hits the streets, and greeting the many people who come into the office to buy newspapers.

Most are regulars, and we appreciate all of you, whether you buy it at our office, from a vendor or receive it via the United States Postal Service.

Community newspaper readers are looking for news that’s important to them – school news, board meetings, sports, weddings – and ads from local merchants. And that’s what we provide.

Local newspapers are committed to the community and the people who live in them.

“Well, all I know is what I read in the papers.”
– Will Rogers

“America is a country of inventors, and the greatest of inventors are the newspaper men.”
– Alexander Graham Bell

The South Reporter is wrapping up its 154th year. It got its start in 1865.

Its longevity is a testament to the support of the good people of Marshall County.

Holly Springs South Reporter

P.O. Box 278
Holly Springs, MS 38635
PH: (662) 252-4261
FAX: (662) 252-3388
www.southreporter.com

Web Archive